The Quest | The Free Press of Reed College

The Sound Attendance: Kanye West

If you’re in need of a conversation starter this week, you’re in luck because a new Kanye West release just came out.

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Remembering Reed’s Presidents’ Areté

Muriel Wyatt started Reed College as a freshman in 1943. Her mother attended Reed under William Foster, Reed’s very first president, but dropped out during World War One to get married and attend secretarial school. When Wyatt’s mother moved to Corvallis, Oregon, with her husband and her growing family, President Foster made the trip down […]

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Sustainability Committee Sits on $13,000

Though Reed’s Sustainability Committee has $13,000 in reserve, it does not have any plans to spend it. The committee, founded in the spring of 2009, has been “a dead horse” for much of its life, says Senator Marie Perez ’12, Senate liaison to the committee. The Sustainability Committee has not yet met this year, and […]

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The Sound Attendance: Susanne Sundfør and Daddy

NEW SINGLES Susanne Sundfør: The Silicone Veil. EMI Norway [SPACEY GLAM] For Fans Of: Joanna Newsom, Lana Del Rey I remember that the first time I listened to Lana Del Rey’s “Born to Die” I had a strange feeling that the song was made for me. It had taken the parts of pop that I […]

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Alumni Map Reed’s Future

Unbeknownst to students, the alumni flooding campus last weekend were here not only to celebrate President Kroger’s inauguration, but to plot the future of the college as a whole. The Reed Leadership Summit, previously known as Volunteer Weekend, met Friday and Saturday. President of the Alumni Board Chantal Sudbrack ‘97 says it was bigger than […]

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Science Savvy: Eye’ll Be Back

In Luc Besson’s 1997 cult film, The Fifth Element, scientists recreate the perfect human from just a few cells. Though we’re far from being able to grow an entire Milla Jovovitch in an incubator, we are closer than ever to growing replacement body parts.

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ODB Fumigates for Bed Bugs

Whilst studying Ancient Egypt in Hum 110 last week, some freshman residents of Old Dorm Block might have felt a little closer to the study material than they cared for. One of the ten biblical plagues, that of lice and nits, descended onto Kerr in the terrifying form of the common bedbug. Rooms had to […]

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Insects Invade Dorms

On-campus residences are dealing with a new nuisance. Living halls like Canyon House, Aspen, Sitka, ODB, and the Birchwood Apartments have had encounters with ants, bed bugs, and silverfish. Wasp’s nests have been found on dorms across campus. “I’m not bothered by [them]. I’m bothered by the fact that they are there,” says Paloma Martinez-Miranda […]

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Science Savvy: How Cellular Conversations Shape Embryonic Development

Have you ever wondered why you don’t have more than two eyes or why they’re on your face instead of the top of your head? During early embryonic development, the cells destined to be your eyes are indistinguishable from other cells in the developing brain. Then, in response to specific changes in their environment, the future eye cells start to express different genes than their neighbors and even start to move differently.

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Groups Lose Votes in Funding Poll, Signators Likely at Fault

Some student groups may have missed the chance to receive votes. An unknown number of groups were not included in funding poll for the poll’s first few days, due to confusion on the part of signators as to how to register their groups for the poll.

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Zumba Classes to Return Next Quarter

Zumba, one of Reed’s most popular physical education classes of the last few years, was cancelled two weeks before the start of the fall semester.

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The Honor Principle: Tool or Machine?

The intended purpose of Reed’s Honor Principle was to suspend the college in a state of perpetual tension. By choosing not to codify it, as other schools had done, Reed’s founding president, William Trufant Foster, sought to make it more a tool of freedom than a machine of authoritarian enforcement.

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Science Savvy: Fish Eyes, Stem Cells, and Cancer

A tug-of-war between nature and nurture is alive and well inside each of us.

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The Sound Attendance: Waiting for Gotye

Though I made a hefty pilgrimage to the Gotye concert at Edgefield Ampitheatre in Troutdale on a loaded, bouncing TriMet bus that wafted KFC odors into the night sky, I clumsily missed the prescribed date.

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The Sound Attendance: Dan Deacon and WHY?

On his previous successful albums, Dan Deacon urged listeners to engage in action of the fanatical, flailing, human firework variety. At performances (RF 2010 anyone?) Deacon would install himself as ruler of the dance-floor regime, shouting out moves like the crowd was playing a giant game of Simon Says.

On his new album, America, Deacon, of Baltimore, uses his eccentric noise to goad his listeners into action outside of the dance hall.

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Colin Diver: Champion of the Honor Principle?

Former president of Reed College Colin Diver championed the Honor Principle in a letter to The Boston Globe on Wednesday in response to a recent cheating scandal at Harvard University. “Recent allegations of widespread cheating in a course at Harvard have provoked much hand-wringing among Harvard professors and administrators,” Diver says. “Their diagnoses and prescriptions […]

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Students Dunk Kroger at Activities Fair

John Kroger sat awaiting his fate as students tried their aim at the target that would plunge the new president into the water below. It wasn’t long before they succeeded.

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Senate Beat: A New Hope

There is a shadowy body that regulates your Student Body funds, appointments, and general goings-on. What is this mysterious group? It’s the Reed College Student Body Senate. Coverage of their first meeting this year can be found in approximately exactly five paragraphs.

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Cooley Gallery to Show Controversial Artist

It isn’t uncommon to look at a work of art and wonder “is this supposed to be a penis?” but in Kara Walker’s cut-outs, the question may be justified. On September 4th, her exhibit More and Less opens in Reed’s Cooley Gallery. It will feature a new film in her signature style of silhouette puppetry, […]

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The Sound Attendance

Welcome to The Sound Attendance: Crackerjack reviews of new releases covering bands fated to self-inflicted obscurity, to saccharine mainstream indie darlings, to Portland core (Reed core are you there??). Concert and haunted-house reviews are likely to be finagled when opportunity strikes, as are reviews of band websites and special releases. Know a local band you […]

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Canyon Escapes Near Brush with Fire Unscathed

While much of Oregon faced the state’s worst wildfires in more than a century, the Canyon had a near brush with a blaze of its own. Two “unknown individuals” detonated a firecracker near the land bridge during the Weapons of Mass Distraction fire show on August 22, according to Director of Community Safety Gary Granger. […]

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Senior Debunks Reed Myths

Dear New Reedies, You’re probably overwhelmed with advice at this point. That said, I’d like to take a shot at the semi-annual “an upperclassman attempts to impart wisdom” article and address a few things about Reed that – in this humble senior’s opinion – are either questionable, counterproductive, or patently false. I hope to help […]

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Reedies: The Fulbright Program Awaits You!

By Thomas Burns ‘98 I am often struck by how well-suited Reedies are for the US Fulbright Program, and surprised more students and alumni don’t apply. A Fulbright Scholarship is an opportunity to design a nine-month overseas project or course of study that you are passionate about in the country of your choice. Fulbright provides […]

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Senate Beat: Honor Class and Renn Fayre Funding

At the start of this week’s Senate meeting, it seemed like the meeting would result in nothing more than a droll presentation of student bureaucracy. This Quest reporter was privileged to be one of four students watching the Senators at work (this is not counting the burner who quickly scurried off as the gavel struck […]

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Student Body Wage Changes

Student body position wage changes made on Thursday, April 12. Position Current Per Sem. Current Per Month (per member) Proposed Per Sem. Proposed Per Month (per member) JBoarda 5500 137.5 5500 137.5 Appeals Board Student 0 0 100 25 JBoard co-chair 2000 250 2000 250 JBoard secretary 720 60 1440 120 Presidentb 1425 285 1425 […]

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Senate Receives Wage Recommendations

The Student Body Wage Review Board presented its recommendations to Senate on Thursday, April 5. The set of recommendations is “moderate” according to Senator Shabab Mirza, who worked on the SBWRB before being elected to Senate, since it would only cost the student body $1,741 per semester. Many positions would receive a raise under the […]

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Portland & Native American Voices: Dark Past, Bright Future

Bursting colors, dancing feet and beautiful Native American song filled the Chapel on March 28, as part of the 2012 Vine Deloria Jr. Lecture Series. Representing the Multnomah County Native American community, traditionally garbed young children, and other members of the Native American Youth and Family Center of Portland (NAYA), celebrated the dances they perform […]

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Quest, Senate Debate Quest Reform

Current and former Quest editors brought forth a proposal for Quest reform to last Thursday’s Senate meeting. The proposal, brought forward by Senator Shabab Mirza, would replace the system of electing editors in place since 1921 with one in which outgoing editors will appoint their replacements. The Quest Board argues that elections are an arbitrary […]

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The Reedies for Somalia End of the Year Event

At the beginning of this year, a group of freshman sat together on the grass in front of Commons trying to figure out what they could do to help alleviate the hunger crisis in Somalia. They became Reedies for Somalia. Since then, a lot has happened. Reedies for Somalia has raised awareness of the situation […]

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Student Presidential Finalists Interviewers

The Quest sent questions to the students chosen to interview presidential candidates. Of the fifteen students that were picked, seven sent responses. Molly Case ’12 Major and Hometown: Economics major from Sudbury, Massachusetts. Why you volunteered for the lottery: I think that the Presidential position is one of enormous importance and influence at Reed, and […]

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Stalk up on some Tarkovsky

by Lyle Daniel, Max Carpenter and Sammie Massey Three films of Andrei Tarkovsky’s sparse but numinous repertoire will be shown by the Russian House over the coming week in celebration of the monumental director’s 80th birthday. One of these showings, The Mirror, already passed, on Tarkovsky’s true birthday April 4, but there are two other […]

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From the Archives: Cat Gets Tongue of Lutz Patron

[Editor’s Note: This story ran on the front page of The Quest on November 8, 1994 and was written by Adam Warner.] An altercation between a Lutz Tavern bartender and a customer resulted in severed body parts and allegations of negligence against a Reed student. A little past 10 PM on the night of October 27, […]

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From the Archives: Student Sip Near-Beer for Sociology

[Editor’s note: This story ran originally in The Quest on March 3, 1916 and was reprinted on September 25, 1961.] To determine the effect of prohibition upon the former patrons of saloons, five Reed College students, clad in the garments of laboring en, have been mingling for the past two weeks with the denizens of the North End, eating […]

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Op-Ed: Senate Too Slow on Student Body Wages

Senate has demonstrated that it remains a sluggish bureaucracy. Student Body Wage Review Committee has failed to deliver a report on student body wages by the time it said it would. Not only do Honor Council members effectively make $1.73 an hour for their work, according to Quest research, but the Senate Secretary effectively makes […]

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Opinion: Migrant Farm Workers Suffer in Oregon

We talk a lot about where our food comes from and whether it is organic or fresh, but what about the question of who picked it? On Wednesday night, I was reminded that the apples and berries we buy and eat in Oregon are often picked by young children who have been pulled out of […]

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